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‘Spy’ cell phones expose their data to companies; understand

Ponsel 'Spy' memaparkan data mereka ke perusahaan;  memahami

How many times have you read the privacy policies and terms of use for websites and applications? If your answer was not “every time”, know that your digital security may be at risk. With the advancement of technology and the massive presence of the Internet on a daily basis, some precautions are essential to preserve your privacy. Cell phones can, yes, «listen» to what you say and know how to protect yourself is essential to maintain a healthy relationship with technology.

READ: Google knows everything you do on the Internet; erase

Gustavo Artese, a specialist in Information Technology law and a partner at Viseu Advogados, confirms that connectivity can indeed be a risk to privacy. Despite all the advantages that technology can bring, you don’t necessarily need to post on social networks to expose yourself. The fact that you have many objects and devices connected to the internet inside your home already does this for you.

1 of 3 Reading the privacy policies and terms of use of websites and applications is essential for your digital security – Photo: Luciana Maline / TechTudo

Reading the privacy policies and terms of use of websites and applications is essential for your digital security – Photo: Luciana Maline / TechTudo

This scenario is linked to the concept of Internet of Things (IoT), which defines the connectivity between objects, people and the internet. Softwares that collect and transmit data, GPS, bluetooth, facial recognition, artificial intelligence: all this forms a network that enters our life instinctively, but that, without due care, can become dangerous.

Artese explains, for example, how just being in an environment with multiple devices connected to the internet already connects you with the world. «Speaking in terms of data protection, there is the potential risk that anyone will have their privacy affected by IoT. After all, they are computers in the form of household equipment, equipped with sensors and collecting a series of data, such as voice, biometrics and consumption data ”, he explains.

It’s like living in a glass house, where anyone outside can watch what you do. Although it sounds scary, it doesn’t mean that you should exclude technology from your life. Just use it consciously. For example, when we talk about facial recognition.

With the popularization of funny photo filters on social networks, it is not impossible to think that some applications use this technology to collect information. “If the person is not sure whether a particular application can do this, we suggest reading the privacy policy and terms of use. If they are not clear on the topic, not using the application is the solution ”, guides the expert.

2 of 3 Filters and applications can use facial recognition to collect data – Photo: Nicolly Vimercate / TechTudo

Filters and applications can use facial recognition to collect data – Photo: Nicolly Vimercate / TechTudo

Another controversy involving IoT is the theory that our cell phone is «listening» to everything we talk about. Like the time you talked to someone about a specific brand and, shortly after, started receiving online ads for the same brand. “Technically this is possible and is likely to be done, even for the purpose of improving services based on electronic assistants. Companies are still learning to listen to us, ”says Artese.

The lawyer considers that the purpose of this «listening» should be to improve an existing service and not to offer new ones. To be transparent about this is a duty of the companies, as well as taking security measures in relation to this process. » Data must be discarded as soon as it has served its purpose. In the world of computing, it takes a fraction of a second, «he says.

Whoever must monitor compliance with the General Data Protection Law is the National Data Protection Authority. But, for those who want to take their own security measures, Artese indicates that an alternative for prevention is to turn off location sharing, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, subscriptions and cell phone ads.

3 of 3 Avoiding questionable links is a way to protect your digital privacy – Photo: Luana Marfim / TechTudo

Avoiding questionable links is a way to protect your digital privacy – Photo: Luana Marfim / TechTudo

Another way to protect yourself is to avoid links and applications forwarded by other people, even if they are friends and acquaintances. The ideal, according to Artese, is to seek the company’s official website to confirm his security measures. Sites with the lock icon, for example, are considered more secure.

The expert points out that reading the privacy policies and terms of use of websites and applications is also essential. As well as checking the links to confirm their authenticity, since pirate sites often use fonts and icons that are practically identical to official ones. Another alternative is to better research the reputation of these platforms on Google and Reclame Aqui.

In social networks, you also need to be careful, especially when sharing information. “You should not post information, photos or data that can, in any way, easily identify the person. For example: addresses, telephone numbers, ID, passport, enrollment of educational institutions, and specifically, financial and health-related information ”, guides Artese.

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