Frame: speed of DisplayPort protocols

New DisplayPort 2 standard introduced, with support for 16K displays

THE Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA) today announced the new standard DisplayPort 2.0, the first major update to the video protocol since version 1.4, launched in 2016.

Frame: speed of DisplayPort protocols

Among the improvements, DisplayPort 2.0 offers a 3x increase in data transfer speed compared to the previous version. The biggest breakthrough, perhaps, is support for even higher video resolutions, which go beyond 8K.

DisplayPort 2.0 specifically has a maximum bandwidth of 77Gbps, allowing support for monitors with resolution up to 16K! This makes it also the first standard to support 8K resolutions at a rate of 60Hz with 4: 4: 4 resolution (color).

The new standard is also backward-compatible and includes all of the major features of DisplayPort 1.4, such as support for the DSC codec, as well as HDR and FEC data transfer.

Although the new standard supports higher speeds, it can be configured normally from existing DisplayPort, USB-C or Thunderbolt 3 inputs, which will support the following specifications:

Single view

  • A 16K monitor (15360 × 8460 pixels) with a 4: 4: 4 aspect ratio at 60Hz and HDR (with DSC).
  • A 10K monitor (10240 × 4320 pixels) with a 4: 4: 4 aspect ratio at 60Hz (without compression).

Dual screen

  • Two 8K monitors (7680 × 4320 pixels) with 4: 4: 4 aspect ratio at 120Hz and HDR (with DSC).
  • Two 4K monitors (3840 × 2160 pixels) with a 4: 4: 4 aspect ratio at 144Hz (without compression).

Three views

  • Three 10K monitors (10240 × 4320 pixels) with 4: 4: 4 aspect ratio at 60Hz and HDR (with DSC).
  • Three 4K monitors (3840 × 2160 pixels) with a 4: 4: 4 aspect ratio at 90Hz and HDR (without compression).

DisplayPort 2.0 will certainly be beneficial for Apple’s recently announced display, the Pro XDR Display, and will likely be supported on future Macs – but it is unclear when Apple will adopt the standard. According to VESA, the first products to support the new specifications are expected to hit the market in 2020.

via MacRumors