Worst Passwords of 2019: Ranking Reveals Which Words You Shouldn't Use | Security

FBI recommends 'abandoning' passwords and replacing them with key phrases | Security

When it comes to secure passwords, you can think of combinations that mix numbers, letters and special characters, such as "T3ch_Tud0% * $ #". There are even sites that make these features a prerequisite for preparing the code. However, a campaign launched by the FBI in the past week has checked the validity of this concept that we have believed in for so long. The agency is encouraging users to exchange their traditional passwords for key phrases, which would be more secure.

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According to the Federal Investigation Department, guidelines recently established by the National Institute of Fathers and Technology (NIST) indicate that the length of a password is much more important than its complexity. The agency recommends that, instead of a short and complex code, users opt for longer passwords, composed of several words and with at least 15 characters. That is, a key phrase.

FBI recommends 'abandoning' passwords and replacing them with key phrases Photo: pond5FBI recommends 'abandoning' passwords and replacing them with key phrases Photo: pond5

FBI recommends 'abandoning' passwords and replacing them with key phrases Photo: pond5

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"The extra length of a key phrase makes it difficult to crack the password, as well as making it easier to remember," explains the FBI. The idea behind the organ's advice is that a longer password, even based on simpler words and without special characters, will take more time to crack and require more computational resources.

Also according to the FBI, a password like "ReadTechnologyNodnetc" is strong enough, but combining unrelated words is an even safer tactic.

'Worst Internet Passwords' Use Series Character Names

'Worst Internet Passwords' Use Series Character Names

Users who are having trouble creating the combination can go to the site useapassphrase, capable of generating codes at random. The platform also tells you how long it would take for the password to be broken. To give you an idea, while a combination like "T3ch_Tud0% * $ #" would keep hackers occupied for 627 thousand centuries, the phrase "LeioSobreTecnologiaNodnetc" would take more than 2.9 trillion centuries to be cracked.

Site Use Passphase helps you create key phrases Photo: Reproduo / Ana Letcia LoubakSite Use Passphase helps you create key phrases Photo: Reproduo / Ana Letcia Loubak

Site Use Passphase helps you create key phrases Photo: Reproduo / Ana Letcia Loubak

The FBI also recommends that users use password managers, programs that store all codes in one place and use encryption to ensure the security of information. The tip helps especially those who have difficulties in memorizing the combinations, since it will only be necessary to remember the manager's opening password.