Check out our second wave of OS X El Capitan 10.11 news; learn more about new 2-step authentication

Check out our second wave of OS X El Capitan 10.11 news; learn more about new 2-step authentication

We talked a little about the news of OS X El Capitan 10.11, but now we're back with more!

Check out:

OS X El Capitan betaOption to change the location of the downloaded file in Safari | Image: Vinicius DhomCarvalho
OS X El Capitan betaOption to hide the menu bar | Image: Everaldo Coelho
OS X El Capitan betaNotice to put apps in their proper folder | Image: Sadi O. Junior
OS X El Capitan betaUsing gesture to delete an item from the Reading List | Image: Silvio Sousa Cabral
OS X El Capitan betaUsing gesture to delete a conversation in Messages | Image: Silvio Sousa Cabral
OS X El Capitan betaCalendar app news | Image: Eduardo Marques
OS X El Capitan betaUploading a YouTube video to Apple TV via AirPlay | Image: Lus Maurcio Zanin
OS X El Capitan betaUploading a YouTube video to Apple TV via AirPlay | Image: Lus Maurcio Zanin

THE 9to5Mac he also informed that now, by dragging a window off the top bar inside Mission Control, it is possible to move it back to the desktop as a separate window.

Two-step authentication of OS X El Capitan 10.11 and iOS 9

As reported by the MacRumors, the third beta versions of the systems that are the same as the first public ones brought novelties in terms of security. This involves two-step authentication (two-factor authentication), which is a more advanced system than the one currently used by Ma (two-step verification, or two-step verification).

This support article (in English) from Apple explains how the feature works. In short, two-step authentication is an additional layer of security for your Apple ID, designed to prevent unauthorized access to your account and protect your photos, documents and other data that you store on company servers. The idea is to keep your account secure even if someone can access your password. The feature was developed directly and natively on operating systems, which according to Apple makes it very easy to use.

Two-step authentication

Those who already have two-step verification enabled will notice that this new feature is “the same, but a little different”. The concept is basically the same, but the execution changes. Instead of a 4-digit numeric code, two-step authentication consists of a 6-digit code and is requested whenever you log in with your Apple ID on a new device or browser.

The cool thing is that, instead of choosing which device you want to send the code to, it will automatically be displayed on any Apple device where you are already logged in with your Apple ID (and running iOS 9 or OS X El Capitan, of course). Just enter the code to complete the security process and enter.

If you don't happen to have any of your Apple devices around, you can receive the code on your phone via text message or phone call.

As soon as you are able to log in to a device for the first time, you no longer need to use two-step authentication again, unless you delete the content of the device, remove it from the list of trusted devices, or need to change your password for reasons security. When entering iCloud.com for the first time, you can also choose to trust your browser / computer so that it does not ask for authentication codes the next time you sign in.

According to Apple, two-step authentication uses different methods to trust devices and offers more verification codes than the current two-step verification, which results in a more user-friendly experience.

You will no longer have to keep the key recovery policy, as it simply no longer exists. To change your password (even if you forgot the current one), just enter ICloud Account Settings, select the option “Password & Security” and make the switch.

If you happen to be stolen or lose your phone, it is important to go to Find My iPhone (either from another device or through iCloud.com) and put your stolen device in “Lost Mode”. It is also important to enter iCloud Account Settings (on iOS) or iCloud System Preferences Account Details (on OS X) to remove such a stolen / lost device from trusted devices, so that it no longer receives authentication codes.

So far only a few people have been invited to test this new system. If you were one of them, know that if you choose to participate, you will only be able to return to the current system (two-step verification) in up to two weeks. After that, there is no turning back and since two-step authentication only works on OS X El Capitan and iOS 9, you will be stuck with them while everything is still in the testing phase.