Automatic repair of Windows 10 does not work?  Correct the loop on the PC

Automatic repair of Windows 10 does not work? Correct the loop on the PC

Automatic repair of Windows 10 does not work?  Correct the loop on the PC

Automatic Windows 10 repair may not work and leave your PC in a bootloop that often does not solve the problem. In addition, it is only reported that «Automatic Repair failed to repair your PC». Then, the system offers options to shut down the computer or try to resolve the issue with «Advanced options». Understand why automatic repairs happen and how to fix the loop on your PC.

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1 of 6 Automatic Windows 10 repair doesn’t work? See how to fix the loop on the PC – Photo: Edivaldo Brito / dnetc

Automatic repair of Windows 10 does not work? See how to fix the loop on the PC – Photo: Edivaldo Brito / dnetc

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How do automatic repair loops happen?

The most common reason for auto repair loops is when Windows doesn’t shut down properly – due to a power failure, a failure, or when the notebook battery runs out, for example.

If this happens, the data in the registry may be filled with incomplete and corrupted entries, and the hard disk may become corrupted, since the reading arm did not have time to enter the standby position.

To prevent the PC from entering the auto repair loop, always shut down the computer correctly. However, if you were unable to avoid this, see possible solutions to the problem.

Start Windows normally

Let’s start with the simplest solution: sometimes, the automatic repair loop can occur not because there is really a problem with your PC, but because Windows mistakenly thinks there is one.

To get around the loop, press F8 repeatedly when the PC is booting, to enter the Windows Boot Manager. Then select the option «Start Windows normally».

2 of 6 Selecting the option «Start Windows normally – Photo: Edivaldo Brito / dnetc

Selecting the option «Start Windows normally – Photo: Edivaldo Brito / dnetc

Perform a system restore

The next step is to try to perform a system restore. For this to work, keep in mind that you will need to have system protection previously enabled in Windows.

Your auto repair loop should take you to the blue screen called «Advanced boot options». Select «Troubleshooting».

3 of 6 Accessing the «Troubleshooting» option – Photo: Edivaldo Brito / dnetc

Accessing the «Troubleshooting» option – Photo: Edivaldo Brito / dnetc

On the next screen, access the item «Advanced options».

4 of 6 Accessing the item «Advanced options» – Photo: Edivaldo Brito / dnetc

Accessing the item «Advanced options» – Photo: Edivaldo Brito / dnetc

Click on the «System Restore» option and then select a date before the problems start.

5 of 6 Selecting and entering the option «System Restore» – Photo: Edivaldo Brito / dnetc

Selecting and entering the option «System Restore» – Photo: Edivaldo Brito / dnetc

You can also use the command prompt to try to get your PC out of the loop. On the advanced startup screen, click «Troubleshooting», «Advanced options». From there, click on «Command Prompt».

6 of 6 Opening the Command Prompt in «Advanced options» – Photo: Edivaldo Brito / dnetc

Opening the Command Prompt in «Advanced options» – Photo: Edivaldo Brito / dnetc

Then, enter the commands below, separated by the Enter key. Note that for the last command, the «c:» will depend on your Windows drive letter.

  • bootrec.exe / rebuildbcd
  • bootrec.exe / fixmbr
  • bootrec.exe / fixboot
  • bootrec.exe / chkdsk / rc:

In the worst case, you will need to reinstall Windows. You can do this from the advanced boot screen. Just go to «Troubleshoot», «Reset your PC» and follow the instructions.

Ready! When your PC returns to normal operation, be careful when turning it off.