Apple partners with American university to encourage diversity in code teaching

Apple partners with American university to encourage diversity in code teaching

Apple partners with American university to encourage diversity in code teaching

Apple’s commitment to bringing programming language teaching to everyone and making the world of developers more diverse continues. This time, Apple entered into a partnership with Tennessee State University, one of the Historically Black Universities in the United States (HBCU) – higher education institutions founded before the Civil Rights Act of 1964 aimed at African-American communities (and, to this day, they still have a large black majority in their student body).

In the last week, the university launched a new initiative, called HBCU C2 Presidential Academy, which aims to bring programming language teaching to black or minority ethnic students. With the program, students from 14 Historically Black Universities were invited to learn code concepts and practices from Apple professionals.

The Apple, in addition to offering the expertise of its professionals, will also contribute with equipment and financial support for the initiative. Students, in turn, are encouraged to think of applications and solutions that are beneficial to their communities and the institution itself – a group, for example, is developing an app that will help university students find car seats in parking lots campuses.

Tim Cook celebrated the news on Twitter:

Anything is possible when people come together with a shared vision. Thanks to Tennessee State University for its leadership and enthusiasm in bringing programming language teaching to your community and other HBCUs around the country!

Apple’s vice president of social, political and environmental initiatives, Lisa Jackson, also commented on the good news, stating that “students from all contexts should have the opportunity to learn programming language” and that the company is “proud to participate in a sustainable community network that is expanding access to teaching and learning opportunities ”.

Very well then.

via MacRumors