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6 things you should avoid in video conferencing for your security | Stay at home

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So the TechTudo prepared a list with some security tips that can be useful for those who use the video call feature, such as not disclosing the link for accessing groups on social networks or paying attention to the permissions of the videoconference apps, so that they do not have access to personal information.

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Security tips can prevent invasion of privacy during video calls Photo: Divulgao / Google

Security tips can prevent invasion of privacy during video calls Photo: Divulgao / Google

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1. Avoid displaying personal details

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Zoom inserts virtual backgrounds into the environment Photo: Reproduo / Rodrigo Fernandes

Zoom inserts virtual backgrounds into the environment Photo: Reproduo / Rodrigo Fernandes

At work meetings, avoid displaying photos and talking about family matters, and do not share personal data, such as addresses. Pay attention, too, to information that may be visible in your background, such as messages and sensitive reminders that may appear to other members.

Apps like Skype and Zoom can be useful to cover up this type of information seen, offering options for scenarios to be inserted as a background, or that gives a blur, blurring the environment from behind.

2. Don't leave video calls open

Do not leave video calls unprotected. The ideal is to allow members to join only by password, when the function is available. Leaving calls open can imply a number of risks, allowing strangers and even cybercriminals to access the meeting. In addition, avoid accessing video calls through unprotected Wi-Fi networks, as this can also compromise the security and privacy of shared information.

3. Be aware of the permissions granted to applications

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 it is important to be aware of the permissions granted to apps Photo: Bruno De Blasi / TechTudo

it is important to be aware of the permissions granted to apps Photo: Bruno De Blasi / TechTudo

It is important to pay attention to the permissions granted by apps downloaded from the Google Play Store and App Store virtual stores. Be suspicious of invasive permissions, and check the data to which the app requires access to work, which should only be related to the functioning of the smartphone's camera and microphone.

Fake or corrupted apps can serve as phishing for dangerous malware, which can compromise your security and result in the sharing of personal information shared in video calls.

4. Disable pop-up notifications when sharing screen

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Disabling WhatsApp pop-up notifications Photo: Reproduction / Lvia Dmaso

Disabling WhatsApp pop-up notifications Photo: Reproduction / Lvia Dmaso

When sharing your computer or cell phone screen during video calls, it is important to disable pop-up notifications for emails, social networks and messaging apps like Telegram and WhatsApp, for example. The messages can deal with personal and private matters, so it is necessary to disable them to avoid discomfort due to possible invasion of privacy.

5. Send the call invitation by email

Do not share invitations to video call invitations via social networks, prefer to forward them privately using the email address of the meeting members. Sharing the invitation URL in public virtual environments such as Facebook or Twitter can attract strangers and cybercriminals to the video call, compromising information from the participants.

Another option is also to block the video call as soon as all participants are present, making it impossible for strangers to access the meeting.

6. Customize participant authorizations

It is also possible to customize which shares can be granted to members of a meeting in videoconferences. The user who opened the meeting can grant authorizations such as screen sharing and recording the call to other participants when necessary, but it is recommended to leave them disabled by default.

In addition, media sharing and file transfer can also be disabled, thus preventing files corrupted with viruses or malware from being shared in meetings.

Home office: see tools for working at home on the coronavirus

Home office: see tools for working at home on the coronavirus