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Technology causes discussion among 80% of couples, research reveals | Internet

A January survey by Kapersky Lab revealed that 80% of couples have already argued for reasons involving technology. Among the main causes of disagreement are: spending too much time on the cell phone, paying more attention to the phone than to the partner and misinterpreting texts or emojis.

The study also pointed out curious numbers about the use of technology among couples, such as the high rate of sharing cell phone passwords, the need for permission to post photos with a partner and the frequency of online conversation between partners. Check out other interesting data on technology and relationships in the following lines.

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Research indicates that excessive cell phone use can be harmful for couples Photo: Reproduo / Kaspersky LabResearch indicates that excessive cell phone use can be harmful for couples Photo: Reproduo / Kaspersky Lab

Research indicates that excessive cell phone use can be harmful for couples Photo: Reproduo / Kaspersky Lab

The study was carried out in partnership with the research firm Toluna, and interviewed 18,000 people (equal numbers of men and women) in 18 countries, including Brazil. All participants were over 18 and had been in a stable relationship for at least six months.

1. 80% of couples have fought over technology

According to the survey, almost all respondents have already fought for reasons involving technology. One of the factors that most caused disagreements was the excessive use of smartphones during the couple's personal life, as in meals, for example. The data reveals a companion's frustration in looking less interesting than a device.

This was the situation for 51% of respondents. In addition, 55% of couples, in general, stated that they had already fought over their partner's excessive use of the cell phone at any time. Conversely, the absence of cell phones also generates fights: 45% of couples have already argued because one of the two forgot to charge the device, which caused a lack of communication between them.

2. Half of the interviewees give the partner their cell phone password

50% of the participants declared to share the password or the personal combination of unlocking the cell phone itself. Another 26% said they store intimate content on partner devices. These are cases that demonstrate total confidence in the partner.

Still with regard to cell phone privacy, a dilemma was posed: when a message arrives on the partner's cell phone, do you read the content to him, just let him know that a message has arrived or take advantage of an oversight to snoop on the device? 3% of respondents confessed to crossing the privacy limit and accessing the device without the other's consent. However, the most popular habit among respondents is the famous "stalkear": a third of them admitted that they spy on their partner's steps only through social networks.

Cell phone password shared between boyfriends Photo: Thssius Veloso / TechTudoCell phone password shared between boyfriends Photo: Thssius Veloso / TechTudo

Cell phone password shared between boyfriends Photo: Thssius Veloso / TechTudo

3. Over 70% say they don't have secrets online, but prefer to keep privacy

Individual privacy was defended by the majority of respondents. 72% claim to have nothing to hide from their partners. However, 61% admit that they would not like their partner to know about their online activities, especially regarding the content of messages sent to other people. In other words, more than half believe that each one must have their own private space. On the other hand, 70% of couples also confirmed that the relationship is more important than privacy and, in many cases, not having virtual secrets can be the best way for a good relationship.

4. 45% of couples fight over misinterpretation of messages sent

Almost half of the couples interviewed admitted to having already argued because they misunderstood the texts or images sent by the partner. This rate is higher among boyfriends: 53% of them confessed to confusing their partner's intent in online interactions. Believe me: emojis were also cited in the survey as reasons for fights between couples due to lack of understanding.

These fights were less frequent among married couples: only 38% said they did not understand each other on the Internet. Talking clearly to each other, being honest and objective when expressing feelings can be the best way to avoid unnecessary fights.

Research identified boyfriends who fought over texts and emojis misunderstood Photo: Viviane Werneck / TechTudoResearch identified boyfriends who fought over texts and emojis misunderstood Photo: Viviane Werneck / TechTudo

Research identified boyfriends who fought over texts and emojis misunderstood Photo: Viviane Werneck / TechTudo

5. 56% believe that the partner should ask permission to post photos of you

When entering into a relationship, the concern with the exposure of the image in the digital world ceases to belong only to you and starts to belong to the two individuals involved. Most interviewees think that the partner should ask for their consent before publishing texts, photos and videos of the couple, respecting their private life. In addition to the exhibition, there is a concern with information security. The survey indicated that this behavior is observed mainly among those who admit that they are not completely happy and satisfied with the relationship.

6. More than 60% of couples sharing online services have fought

Couples who share online services can fight more, according to research Photo: Luciana Maline / TechTudoCouples who share online services can fight more, according to research Photo: Luciana Maline / TechTudo

Couples who share online services can fight more, according to research Photo: Luciana Maline / TechTudo

Among the couples interviewed, 55% responded that they share accounts on streaming services like Netflix and Spotify, in addition to work information and bank passwords on the same device. 66% said they fight over shared use. This sharing can be harmful when there is no necessary care with the security of the data and devices of the other.

This is confirmed by the survey itself: one third of respondents have accidentally deleted data, 30% said they had broken a partner's device and 27% even lost it. That is, the devices can unite couples, but they can also distance them, with friction and fights motivated by these reasons.

7. 31% of people avoid asking their partner for help to solve problems online

Still dealing with cases where services and digital devices are shared, nine out of ten people help their partner when he needs to solve a technological problem. However, 31% of people who do not care about cybersecurity avoid asking their partner for help when they face problems on the Internet.

This can lead to loss of data or damaged devices and, consequently, more fights over technology between the couple. Kaspersky also found that men tend to avoid asking for help more often than women (43% versus 28%).

8. A third of couples confessed that they chat more on the Internet than in person

34% of couples stated that they interact with each other more virtually than physically. For these couples, the constant conversations on a daily basis can be healthy for the relationship, reducing the distance caused by the work routine and studies. This number is higher among dating couples, who generally live in separate houses, than among partners who live together. Statistics also grows between same-sex relationships, of which 66% of male couples and 42% of female couples said they chat more on the Internet than in person.

A third of the couples interviewed stated that they chat more on the Internet than in person. Photo: Reproduction / Kaspersky LabA third of the couples interviewed stated that they chat more on the Internet than in person. Photo: Reproduction / Kaspersky Lab

A third of the couples interviewed stated that they chat more on the Internet than in person. Photo: Reproduction / Kaspersky Lab

9. 52% delete photos of the ex when they end the relationship

The privacy and security of the shared information are also matters dealt with after the end of the relationship. 52% of people said they wiped all of their ex boyfriend's information off their cell phones. At this time, it is important to respect the personal and intimate data that has been shared between the two.

Regarding social networks, 48% of respondents delete all information shared after the end of the relationship. Another 48% end their virtual friendship with their ex-partner, and 37% still block them in order to prevent any kind of contact. But the survey also found that 31% of people continue to spy on the ex's life on social media.