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How to find 'hidden' Chrome settings? See three tips | Browsers

Chrome has hidden functions that can improve the user experience and customize the browser. Tool that automatically generates secure passwords, crash monitor and RAM saving features are some examples. The settings, although little known, can be found simply by typing chrome: // about, chrome: // flags or installing an extension. Here's how to use Chrome's hidden menus and get the most out of the Google browser.

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1. Using chrome: // about

By typing chrome: // about (without the quotation marks) in the address bar, you will have access to a panel with various Chrome functions. They are links to internal pages and each deals with a specific function. They can be used to improve the browser experience or even fix a problem. To use them, just click on the corresponding link. Here's what the most useful hidden functions are for.

In chrome: // about you see Chrome's internal pages, which give you access to hidden features and settings. Photo: Playback / Filipe GarrettIn chrome: // about you see Chrome's internal pages, which give you access to hidden features and settings. Photo: Playback / Filipe Garrett

In chrome: // about you see Chrome's internal pages, which give you access to hidden features and settings. Photo: Playback / Filipe Garrett

chrome: // discards: allows you to place browser tabs to hibernate without closing them, greatly reducing RAM consumption.

In chrome: // discards it is possible to place tabs to manually hibernate, reducing memory consumption. Photo: Playback / Filipe GarrettIn chrome: // discards it is possible to place tabs to manually hibernate, reducing memory consumption. Photo: Playback / Filipe Garrett

In chrome: // discards it is possible to place tabs to manually hibernate, reducing memory consumption. Photo: Playback / Filipe Garrett

chrome: // crashes: brings you an accurate report of your browser crash history. This can be useful for diagnosing and isolating issues and finding out what is causing Chrome to fail.

Crash-specific page will add error logs to make it easier to find solutions Photo: Playback / Filipe GarrettCrash-specific page will add error logs to make it easier to find solutions Photo: Playback / Filipe Garrett

Crash-specific page will add error logs to make it easier to find solutions Photo: Playback / Filipe Garrett

chrome: // omnibox: Here you can define Chrome's address bar behavior by changing the settings for how it should display results and forecasts when you start typing an address.

Omnibox's options (Chrome's address bar) let you refine the automatic search and address suggestions from your browsing history. Photo: Playback / Filipe GarrettOmnibox's options (Chrome's address bar) let you refine the automatic search and address suggestions from your browsing history. Photo: Playback / Filipe Garrett

Omnibox's options (Chrome's address bar) let you refine the automatic search and address suggestions from your browsing history. Photo: Playback / Filipe Garrett

The flags deserve a tip apart because in this menu are the advanced functions of Chrome still in the testing phase. An example is the graphical interface for touch screens on computers and a feature that alone generates secure passwords for you. To find this option, simply type "chrome: // flags" (without quotation marks) in the address bar. Here are some testing features that can be useful in everyday life.

chrome: // flags is the most interesting page, with a lot of experimental functions Photo: Playback / Filipe Garrettchrome: // flags is the most interesting page, with a lot of experimental functions Photo: Playback / Filipe Garrett

chrome: // flags is the most interesting page, with a lot of experimental functions Photo: Playback / Filipe Garrett

Password Generator: Slide the screen until you find the item Automatic password generation and set it to Enabled. This gives Chrome safe password suggestions for you whenever it detects an Internet registration form. Note that whenever you touch something, you need to restart your browser to see the effects of the change.

Feature will generate secure passwords every time you realize you need to enter a new password Photo: Playback / Filipe GarrettFeature will generate secure passwords every time you realize you need to enter a new password Photo: Playback / Filipe Garrett

Feature will generate secure passwords every time you realize you need to enter a new password Photo: Playback / Filipe Garrett

Touch screen interface: If you use a touch screen notebook, you may want to try the graphical interface for touch screens. You can find it in the Touch UI item. Reach it and set it to Automatic, so Chrome will switch to this mode on its own, or use Enabled to force the touch interface all the time.

Option activates graphical interface for touchscreens, useful in hybrid notebooks Photo: Playback / Filipe GarrettOption activates graphical interface for touchscreens, useful in hybrid notebooks Photo: Playback / Filipe Garrett

Option activates graphical interface for touchscreens, useful in hybrid notebooks Photo: Playback / Filipe Garrett

Background Tabs: Another interesting feature among the flags is Chrome's ability to put tabs in the background to hibernate, similar to what Opera does. To enable, look for Automatic tab discarding and set to Enabled.

Function automates background tab management and reduces memory consumption Photo: Playback / Filipe GarrettFunction automates background tab management and reduces memory consumption Photo: Playback / Filipe Garrett

Function automates background tab management and reduces memory consumption Photo: Playback / Filipe Garrett

Disable functions: Everything you find in chrome: // flags are experimental and developing functions, which means that some may just not work properly, or even cause some unexpected. If this is the case, you can correct the problem by returning the page and, with Disabled, turning off functionality to return to the browser stable state.

You can disable the functions if something does not work or cause instability Photo: Playback / Filipe GarrettYou can disable the functions if something does not work or cause instability Photo: Playback / Filipe Garrett

You can disable the functions if something does not work or cause instability Photo: Playback / Filipe Garrett

3. Simply put with the extensive HiddenTools

The HiddenTools extension renders all internal pages in a simpler interface. With the plugin installed in Chrome, you can more easily navigate and quickly find the resource you are looking for. See how to install and use the extensive HiddenTools.

Step 1. Go to the HiddenTools page in the Chrome Web Store and click "Use in Chrome";

Choose "Use in Chrome" to install the extensive Photo: Playback / Filipe GarrettChoose "Use in Chrome" to install the extensive Photo: Playback / Filipe Garrett

Choose "Use in Chrome" to install the extensive Photo: Playback / Filipe Garrett

Step 2. You will find the extension in Chrome near the address bar. If it's not there, see the chrome: // extensions page to access it.

Make sure the extension is active Photo: Play / Filipe GarrettMake sure the extension is active Photo: Play / Filipe Garrett

Make sure the extension is active Photo: Play / Filipe Garrett

Step 3. The extension rearranges Chrome features under other names in the interface. Functions like chrome: // crashes and other usage records are found in Developer, the flags for experimental features are in Experiments. It is important to consider that by clicking on any option you are taken to the original internal page of Chrome. The extensive HiddenTools is only for rearranging items.

Extensive facilitates access to internal Chrome pages Photo: Playback / Filipe GarrettExtensive facilitates access to internal Chrome pages Photo: Playback / Filipe Garrett

Extensive facilitates access to internal Chrome pages Photo: Playback / Filipe Garrett