contador web Saltar al contenido

Linux 3.4.110 LTS Kernel Comes With Many Driver Updates and Enhancements to EXT4

Renowned kernel developer Zefan Li announced yesterday about the immediate availability of the 100th release of the 3.4 kernel which is maintained as LTS. All users using this version of the kernel should update it.

It seems strange that in the middle of the time we live where we have the kernel in its 4.x version and we are announcing a new version of 3.4. But follow here on Diolinux and see how this process works.

Kernel-3-4-110-LTS

Linux 3.4.110 LTS Kernel Comes With Many Driver Updates and Enhancements to EXT4

Renowned kernel developer Zefan Li announced yesterday about the immediate availability of the 100th release of the 3.4 kernel which is maintained as LTS. All users using this version of the kernel should update it.

Many changes have taken place; from networking (mostly Ethernet, Ceph, Stream Control Transmission Protocol (SCTP), Bridge, and Wireless), architecture improvement (x86, ARM, and s390 enhancements), sound enhancements (wm8737, wm8903, wm8955, and wm8960 drivers) , driver updates such as Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI), Bluetooth, Crypto, DMA, GPU (mostly Radeon), InfiniBand, MMC, MTD, PCMCIA, SCSI, TTY, USB, and Watchdog. Improvements have also been made in filesystems EXT4, JBD2, NFS and FUSE.

A total of 81 files were changed, 252 were inserted and 255 deleted.

These changes can be tracked on the tree. GIT

It sounds like a weird announcement here on Diolinux since we have more current kernel versions today. The point is that even having the most current version kernel (like 4.3 which is in its sixth release candidate) does not mean that other previous versions are obsolete. Anyone who has ever used Red Hat Enterprise Linux for example knows that its latest version (7.1) sold with the 3.10.0-229 kernel while the latest version of RHEL 6 (6.7) uses the 2.6.32-573 kernel.

There is a community-active kernel release list on the kerne.org site itself which can be found at Active Kernel Releases.

From this list you can check who the maintainer, which versions are maintained by the maintainers, when these versions come to an end of life, and more. So, don't just get stuck with the kernel version number (the 4.0 kernel has reached the end of its life while 3.4 is still maintained;). I hope this article was a good way to add knowledge as well as spread the word.

_____________________________________________________________________________ See any errors or would you like to add any suggestions to this article? Collaborate, click here. No Submissions shared by the author.

4.8 (95.56%) 18 votes